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Marvin E. Kaplan Sworn in as NLRB Member

Marvin E. Kaplan was sworn in today as a National Labor Relations Board Member for a term ending on August 27, 2020. He succeeds Harry I. Johnson III, who served on the Board from August 12, 2013 to August 27, 2015. Mr. Kaplan was confirmed by the Senate on August 2, 2017.

Board Chairman Philip A. Miscimarra stated, “It is my pleasure to welcome Marvin E. Kaplan to the National Labor Relations Board. He has devoted his career to public service. My colleagues and I look forward to working with Member Kaplan.”

Previous to his appointment to the NLRB, Mr. Kaplan served as Chief Counsel to the Chairman of the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.  Before his work with the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, he served as counsel for the House Committee on Oversight Government Reform and as policy counsel for the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. He also worked at the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Labor Management Standards and with the law firm McDowell, Rice, Smith & Buchanan.  Mr. Kaplan received his J.D. from Washington University in St Louis, and his B.S. from Cornell University.

Board Member Kaplan has selected James R. Murphy to serve as his Acting Chief Counsel.   Mr. Murphy most recently served as Chief Counsel to Member Harry I. Johnson, III, and before that to Member Brian Hayes and Member Peter Schaumber.  He began his career at the Board as a student law clerk in 1974, and has been was a staff counsel or supervisor on the staffs of dozens of Board members.  Mr. Murphy earned his B.A. degree from Princeton University in 1972 and a J.D. from the American University Washington College of Law in 1976.

Established in 1935, the National Labor Relations Board is an independent federal agency that protects employers and employees from unfair labor practices, and protects the right of private sector employees to join together, with or without a union, to improve wages, benefits and working conditions. The NLRB conducts hundreds of workplace elections and investigates thousands of unfair labor practice charges each year.

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